SchoolArts Magazine

APR 2018

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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38 APRIL 2018 SchoolArts M idway through the year, a senior teacher in my depart- ment retired and I had the pleasure of taking over her classes. Her small group of eighth- grade students had a reputation for being very talented and working well above their grade level. I developed this project to challenge them: a tun- nel book constructed with paper, painted with watercolors, and held together with Bristol board matting. A tunnel book is made of a series of layers of paper. Each page features openings that allow the viewer to see through the frame to the pages below, creating an illusion of depth and perspective. Breaking Down Scale In my experience, breaking down an image and determining which portions should be the background, middle ground, and foreground is not a difficult topic to comprehend for middle-school students; however, judging scale can be challenging for them, especially with landscape paint - ings. I have seen many paintings with trees that have large trunks and short stubby branches, or branches that get thicker and not thinner as they get longer. If the painter achieves proper scale in a painting of a realistic sub - ject matter, the viewer's eye will move from one end of the painting to the other, creating interest in the work. Positioning the Horizon Line The most common mistake that my students make when they are drawing in perspective is placing their horizon line too high on the page, making their roads or rivers Each page features openings that allow the viewer to see through the frame to the pages below, creating an illusion of depth and perspective. Tunnel M I D D L E S C H O O L Chris Taylor BOOKS appear so steep that they almost look vertical. Another concept that tunnel books help students with is overlapping elements in landscape or cityscape paintings, which creates interesting shapes and adds depth to the image. When cutting out each of the layers, students discover that they have to cut out more of their image from the first layer but pro - gressively less as they move up past the horizon line on their final back - ground layer. Technical Considerations Even though there is depth already created by placing each layer a few inches apart, students should still apply color like they would in a nor - mal drawing or painting. If they apply their foreground color darker and more saturated than the background, the Aliza Cohen, grade eight.

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