SchoolArts Magazine

APR 2018

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

Issue link: http://www.schoolartsdigital.com/i/949518

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 41 of 62

SCHOOLARTSMAGAZINE.COM 37 Before students began creating their mixed media work, we talked about the benefits and cautions of appropriating images from pop cul- ture. We also investigated current fan art. Then we challenged students to collaboratively design their visual honorarium and documentation. Each television set was to represent a dif- ferent time period in their lives. The final stacked display would show the earliest influences at the base and continue until their current age, which was situated at eye level. Some Considerations We had a small class of twelve teens working on four television sets and ended up with a lot of excess space to cover because each stu - dent seemed to work small and did about two drawings per television. We eventually decided to fill in the negative spaces with acrylic paint, but it would have been ideal to see text and images completely fill the space as well. We used paint markers to draw at first because we thought they would work best, but acrylics turned out to work just as well or better because they didn't leave marker streaks. As we attempted to display the pieces, we eventually discovered that plac - ing air-dry clay between the sets helped to balance out the weight. Possibilities When we invite the worlds and inter- ests of our students to be celebrated within the classroom, it sends a message that their experiences are valid and their voices are important. While students worked on this proj - ect, and laughed and remembered, a community spirit was developed around their shared experiences. This timeline totem has many options for connecting with teachers in other disciplines and could even be an opportunity for art students to seek out their peers who are not in art classes and ask them to lend their voice to a larger school installation. When we invite the worlds and interests of our students to be celebrated within the classroom, it sends a message that their experiences are valid and their voices are important. Amy Migliore is Pennsylvania State Uni- versity and PAEA Design Issues chair. amm629 @ psu.edu N A T I O N A L S T A N D A R D Creating: Conceiving and developing new artistic ideas and work. W E B L I N K americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/paik Using old television sets as a canvas was exciting to students and added a "coolness" factor.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of SchoolArts Magazine - APR 2018