SchoolArts Magazine

October 2016

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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SCHOOLARTSMAGAZINE.COM 37 Choosing an Issue I was inspired to give my advanced placement students a chance to voice their own opinions through a creative lens on some larger, more specific environmental issues. I first showed students a series of environmentally disturbing images and asked them to respond in their sketchbooks. My hope was that their emotional response would help inspire their choices for what their focus would be for an artwork. After the slideshow, I provided students with a list of global issues to choose from for further exploration. These included pollution, overpopulation, poaching, invasive species, global warming, and natural disasters. Next, I asked students two specific questions to consider: 1. Do you feel an artist has a respon- sibility or obligation to society to take a position on global issues? Why or why not? 2. Do you think that artists have the power to influence change, evoke a response, or mobilize people into action through imagery? Explain. Inspired by Giger For further inspiration, we studied selected works by H. R. Giger, a con- temporary artist known most notably for his work on the film Aliens. We focused on Giger's haunting land- scapes, limited color used to evoke mood, packed compositions, and his metamorphosis between the organic and the mechanic. I reinforced specific elements I wanted students to explore, such as mechanic versus organic rela - tionships, repetition, metamorphosis, deconstruction, activation of edges, lighting, and overlapping. Consider the Medium I asked students to develop at least two ideas in their sketchbooks that investigate different compositional arrangements, color schemes, tech- nique exploration, and media experi- mentation. Once this is complete, students gather visual references and begin considering the materials to be used in their final product. Students can select any medium they feel caters to their strengths as an artist. I reminded the class that materials experimentation should always hap- pen first in their sketchbook. The majority of my students are well-versed in material usage, tech- I was inspired to give m advanced placement students a chance to voice their own opinions through a creative lens on some larger, more specific environmental issues. CONTINUED ON PAGE 56. Bonnie Ledford

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