SchoolArts Magazine

September 2015

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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SCHOOLARTSMAGAZINE.COM 35 the different methods of photogra- phy, using film can be an enjoyable and educational way to create pho - tography. Learning about Exposure When using film, it's important to know that the camera has different modes and settings and how to use manual exposure modes. Students can use the automatic settings on a digital or film camera, but once they know how to use the manual exposure settings they can make the exposures darker or lighter depend - ing on their preferences. Teaching students to understand these modes brings them closer to understanding how a camera operates. A good place to start in under - standing the issue of exposure in film photography is by discussing the adjustable elements that control ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. As students learn to take control of the desired shutter speed or aperture value, they will learn to take control of their cameras. The more creative control a student has, the more he or she can master taking photographs. What to Teach It's important to consider the age group you are teaching when intro- ducing film photography. Making pinhole cameras is usually a good starting place for beginners. These cameras do not have lenses, but have a single small aperture, or pinhole. They can be made with various types of containers, such as cans, animal cracker or tea boxes, or cylindrical oatmeal containers. If a teacher can provide a dark- room, students will learn the basic fundamentals of black-and-white film processing, enlarging, and printing. Once students learn the basics of pho- tography, they can become more cre- ative in using their cameras to take great photographs. Bernard Young is professor and director of the Eleanor A. Robb Children's Art Workshop at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona. Bernard.young@ asu.edu N A T I O N A L S T A N D A R D Presenting: Interpreting and sharing artistic work. W E B L I N K art.asu.edu/arted/childrens_work- shops.php

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