SchoolArts Magazine

NOV 2013

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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clay to cut out a base using the clay slats or rulers as a straight edge. The shape of the base can vary and be determined by students. Next, students connected their sculptures to their base. Classmates helped by holding the pieces in place while they were joined. It is very Three-Dimensional Design important that students first place the Students rolled clay into a slab using sculptures on top of the base to see a rolling pin and slats or dowel rods. where it is going to When the clay was evenly rolled out During my travels, I often have contact. The areas of contact on top of a porous look for styles of art my should be scored surface (I like to use foam mats), students students can learn about and slipped to be and be inspired by. sure the sculpture laid their templates adheres to the base. on top of the clay I also had students roll some pillarslabs and traced around them using clay knives or paper clips. Remind stu- shaped clay to use as supports to help the clay stand vertically. These pillars dents to keep the cutting tool straight were placed lightly on either side of up and down all the way around to ensure an even, smooth edge. Students the sculpture and were removed either before or after firing. can use leftover, already rolled-out were complete, students chose their favorite to make into a three-dimensional clay sculpture. From the twodimensional design, they traced the outline of the object on paper to create a template for tracing onto clay. Color Application After the clay pieces dried and were fired, color was applied in a number of ways. Watercolors, acrylic paint, colored permanent markers, or glazes can all be used. All these ways of applying color were successful and captured Britto's style. Romero Britto style sculptures will brighten your students' day. The results are stunning! Michelle McGinley is an art teacher at J.R. Fugett Middle School in West Chester, Pennsylvania. mmcginley@wcasd.net NatioNal StaNdard Students select and use the qualities of structures and functions of art to improve communication of their ideas. Web liNk www.britto.com schoolartsonline.com 33

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