SchoolArts Magazine

AUG-SEP 2008

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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" Tea is universal. After plain water, it is mankind's most frequently consumed beverage . . . For millennia it has inspired the making of exquisite objets d'art, the impedimenta of tea . . . " — Garth Clark, The Artful Teapot Craft in the Classroom Investigate Have students find out more about Animals Always.TheSt.Louis Zoosite(www.stlzoo.org/home/featurednews/animalsalwayssculpture. htm) provides the sculpture's dimensions, including the height of some of the animals. Students can view the sculpture's creation, transportation, and installation at www.youtube. com/watch?v=ie8eSzLvdjc. View the cardboard model at www.softcover. com/stories_paley_model.htm. Lookforothercraftartistswhowork with metal on the Craft in America website, (www.craftinarmerica.org). What different kinds of metal objects can you identify? How does each object "make special" ordinary life experience? Direct students to Albert Paley's website at www.albertpaley.com for other gates. How are these similar to anddifferentfromtheSt.LouisZoo portal? Compare the two tea services. What kind of statement does each artist make? Have students design an object such as a bowl or pitcher in which they make deliberate choices about form and function. Make Have students draw and create a cardboard model for an entrance to a place in their community, such as a park, their school, or a forest. Craft in America is a monthly feature in SchoolArts magazine by Marilyn Stewart, professor of art education, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA; and Kathleen Walck, art educator, Kutztown, PA, for Craft in America, Inc. Christina Smith, In Search of Terra Incognito, tea service, 2002, Anthony Cuñha photograph. Craft in America: The Series Craft in America's nationally broadcast PBS documentary series seeks to celebrate craft by honoring the artists who create it. In three episodes entitled "Memory," "Landscape,"and"Community," Craft in America television viewers travel throughout the United States visiting America's premier craft artists in their studios to witness the creation of handmade objects, and into the homes, businesses, and public spaces where functional art is employed and celebrated. The primary objective of the series is to convey to a national audience the breadth and beauty of handmade objects in our culture. Educator Guides Three Educator Guides accompany Craft in America. Each guide— Memory,Landscape,andCommunity—relates to and reflects the core ideas, artists, and art forms presented in the corresponding series episode. Educator Guides are available at www.pbs.org/teachers. John Prip, Dimension, Tea and Coffee Service, c. 1960. Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design; Elizabeth T. and Dorothy N. Casey Fund, 1999.15, Erik Gould photograph. Ron Ho, Return to Rajasthan, In Memory of Ramona Solberg, June 2005. Courtesy of the artist. Ordering the DVD and Companion Book To order the Craft in America DVD for long-term viewing and classroom use, or to order the companion book Craft in America: Celebrating Two Centuries of Artists and Objects contact PBS Video at 1-800-752-9727, or www.shoppbs.com/teachers. SchoolArts August/September 2008 23

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