SchoolArts Magazine

OCT 2010

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

Issue link: http://www.schoolartsdigital.com/i/148359

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Continued from page 60. By: Rock Paint Distributing Corp. thinking and engage them in analysis and personal interpretation of great masterworks. Dropping in on Impressionists is appropriate for elementary-age children. The quality of the production and illustration is excellent. Sharon Warwick is an art educator from Denton, Texas. Web Reviews Rebecca Arkenberg Powerful Projects www.powerfulprojects.org Quality products, reliable service since 1974 Check out our catalog online! www.handyart.com (800)236-6873 Handy Art® products are proudly made in the USA. e A Circle No. 274 on Reader's Service Card Connecting with others, being part of a global community, using art to focus on a problem, developing a sense of social responsibility, responding to a crisis—these are some of the issues that the Powerful Projects website addresses. Just click on one of the projects listed on the site to learn more; here are a few examples: A Seattle teacher's idea to decorate paper grocery bags for Earth Day is one of the oldest and most successful projects on the site. Paper sacks "borrowed" from the local grocery store are given to schools where students decorate them with environmental messages and designs. The bags are then sent back to the store and used to bag groceries on Earth Day. Haiti Houses was developed by two Florida art teachers as a classroom fundraising project. Complete instructions are given for making tiny houses from cardboard or matboard, painting them in bright colors and patterns, and adding jewelry findings. Participating organizations sell the jewelry on their own and donate the proceeds to one of the listed causes. Many of the projects can be accomplished with easily obtainable materials and low-cost art supplies. Others utilize technology, like "Rotoball," a collaborative animation project designed for high-school students. Rules for entering and a step-by-step guide are included. In 2010, twenty-three schools representing twelve states and six countries entered the contest. Many more great ideas can be found on this website, and if you have developed your own "powerful project," you may submit it as well. Rebecca Arkenberg is a museum consultant from Stratford, Connecticut. Circle No. 321 on Reader's Service Card

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