SchoolArts Magazine

NOV 2012

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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Continued from page 38. Web reviews rebecca Arkenberg Ancient Mesopotamia at the British Museum www.mesopotamia.co.uk The British Museum's interactive feature on ancient Mesopotamia, including Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria, has been available for some time. Consequently, the technology is a little dated, but it is one of the best sites available for teaching the art of the ancient Near East. A "staff room" provides a quick searchable overview of the resources. The site is divided into ten chapters, four of which provide a thematic view. In addition, each civilization has two chapters. Each chapter has three subdivisions: the "Story" presents information in narrative form; "Explore" allows a nonlinear investigation; and the "Challenge" features an interactive game. Throughout the chapters, pop-up windows provide definitions, explanations, and additional information. The "Explore" feature on the "Palaces of Assyria" page includes the floor plan of Ashurnasirpal II's palace at Nimrud. Highlighted areas allow you to explore various rooms, including reliefs of the king, attendants, and protective spirits. The program of each relief is explained, and the Akkadian words for these beings, the Lamassu (the human-headed winged lion sculpture) and Apkallu (sage), and the purification utensils they hold—the bucket (banduddu) and sprinkler (millilu)—are provided. Items of clothing, weaponry, chariots, jewelry, and ritual objects like a parasol and a whisk also are detailed, and the "Standard Inscription," or cuneiform text that runs across every relief is translated. On the British Museum site, PowerPoint slide shows of these cultures can be downloaded for projection in the classroom, along with an explanatory pdf (www.britishmuseum.org/learning/schools_and_teachers/resources/ cultures/ancient_mesopotamia.aspx). Rebecca Arkenberg is a museum consultant from Stratford, Connecticut. 44 November 2012 SchoolArts

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