SchoolArts Magazine

MAR 2013

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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The Dedication community walk in the labyrinth. To celebrate the first community The students from Acoma had never walk, Acoma students, teachers, walked one before and I watched and family memas they walked bers drove into together, leaving Art-making began as a Albuquerque to eat space and showing deeply personal experience respect for everya wonderful meal from a walk in a labyrinth. one who eventuthat was donated by the parents of ally filled up every SSDS. Students who were pen pals path. The labyrinth became a moving, during this project made art together, dancing, energy-filled circle of chilplayed basketball, sang songs, and dren. recited blessings in both Hebrew and the Acoma native language. Acoma Using the Labyrinth children danced in Native costumes My experience of using the labyrinth in front of the labyrinth and Rabbi Joe over the years with students has been Black played guitar and sang songs of more rewarding than I could have ever peace. imagined. I sometimes take classes I had the honor of inviting students out to walk before making art. Stufrom both schools to enter for the first dents have told me that they like the time to think and that walking the labyrinth helps them with their ideas. The labyrinth has also been used for conflict resolution. Students who are having problems getting along walk together and, while in the middle, stop to talk. By the time they come out, they are ready to go play and be friends again. Labyrinth Alternatives It may be difficult or impossible to create a permanent labyrinth for your school, but I would suggest drawing one in sand or finding one that may already exist in your community. Students could also be asked to bring in rocks that could be painted and then placed on concrete, sand, or grass. Continued on page 55. schoolartsonline.com 39

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