SchoolArts Magazine

Summer 2019

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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28 SUMMER 2019 SchoolArts outer shapes. I encouraged them to look at architectural or sculptural objects including textiles, masks, vases, as well as details of those objects along with two-dimensional pieces. I suggested, but did not require, that they consider a com - bination of both ancient and more recent pieces as well as pieces from diverse cultures. Spray-Painted Compositions Students drew each motif on 9 x 12" (23 x 30 cm) white tag board, varying the sizes, and cutting out their sten - cils using scissors and craft knives. They were free to use the positive or negative parts of their stencils, though most used the positive. On the back of each, they placed a little roll of masking tape so that their stencils wouldn't blow around as they spray-painted. Next, students taped a border, nar- row or wide, on their 9 x 12" pieces of white tag board and headed outside with their support, stencils, and bins of spray paint in a wide range of entic- ing colors. Some used sheets of plastic and others painted right on the grass in our courtyard. There was no one way to complete the compositions, but I gave students basic instructions of choosing only three or four colors of paint; spritz - ing lightly and not necessarily across the entire surface; and moving the stencils around, keeping strong composition in mind, between each layer of paint after a minute or so of drying. It is best to work from dark - est value to lightest so that the last layers of paint do not overwhelm the earlier layers. Students let their pieces dry a bit outside and then blew their pieces dry to prevent fume build-up in our workspace. Next, they removed the I believe in meaningfull engaging students right up until the end; if the ave to be at school, there ought to be a good reason. Clockwise from top- left: Megan Domel, grade ten. Kelly Ham, grade ten. Miranda Davis, grade twelve. Jake Belt, grade twelve.

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