SchoolArts Magazine

MAR 2019

SchoolArts is a national art education magazine committed to promoting excellence, advocacy, and professional support for educators in the visual arts since 1901.

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ing with photo shoot locations inside and out- side the classroom. We take a tour of all the available light sources in the school near windows and discuss how to cast the light on the subject's face, not at their back. We also discuss point of view and how the photographer's vantage point can become the observer's point of view. How do you want the viewer to see you as the subject? Is a straight-on portrait of the face the best, or should the point of view be something else? We also discuss and explore other types of lighting that could enhance the concept for the piece. Lastly, we look at how to take pictures using an iPad. Students develop a series of photos that serve as thumbnails for their ideas. Playing with Applications The third step is to give students adequate play- time with the available applications. Both photo- editing and digital painting and drawing apps are explored. We have Jot Pro styluses so students can experiment with mark-making. The goal is for the final portrait to no longer resemble a photograph, but to become a digital illustration. Once students have played, they are ready to edit their photographs and begin digitally painting. They usually bring the photo in as a layer and paint on top of it using the app of their choice. The final results are stunning. Student art- ists have created unique self-portraits that go beyond a selfie and express their true personal - ity and identity. It's a great way to get to know your students as artists and help them begin to develop their artistic voices. Jeanne Bjork is an art educator at Pewaukee High School in Pewaukee, Wisconsin. jeannebjork@ att.net, Twitter: @ bellafiore3 N A T I O N A L S T A N D A R D Producing: Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation. W E B L I N K phsvisualartdept.weebly.com itunes.apple.com/us/book/introduction-to-digital- media/id959437805?mt=13 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39. 38 MARCH 2019 SchoolArts SCHOOLARTSMAGAZINE.COM 39 S elfies are one of today's hottest trends and nearly every student has a cell phone. I decided, why fight the selfie tide when I could help students surf high atop the wave through digital photography, digital imaging techniques, and master art- ists? A crazy combination, you might think, but not that much of a stretch. Using iPads puts a camera and a tab- let in each student's hands, forming the perfect blend of tools for unique digital images that go beyond the average selfie. The many apps that are explored in this unit give students choices about the tools they use to complete their selfies. Asking students to consider the bigger idea of identity and who we are as people takes the selfie beyond a moment of silliness into more thought- ful artistic exploration. Choosing a master artist to emu- late—but not copy—also adds depth to the creations as students choose what aspect of their chosen artist's style they will incorporate into their finished art- works. Lastly, the unit gets students out of their seats and collaborating with each other, creating an atmosphere of collegiality in the artroom. Introduction to Digital Media This is the first unit we cover in our Introduction to Digital Media class taught on iPads with the eBook for the course that I wrote (see Web Link for a free download). The goal of the class is to introduce students to the other advanced digital art classes we offer, which includes Digital Photog- raphy 1 and 2, Animation, Experi- mental Video, and Graphic Design. This self-portrait unit teaches digi- tal painting and drawing and introduc- tory photography, including editing, composition, and lighting techniques. It also dabbles with a bit of art his- tory. It is a winning combination that helps students go beyond the trite, tongue-stuck-out selfie. Yet it starts out at that selfie, reminding students to be playful and experimental in their choice of expression and setting. The list of master artists isn't magical. It includes contemporary and historical artists who provide students with rich possibilities for stylistic paint application and use a variety of media to make art. Students do visual research first to learn more about the artists on the list. I give an overview mentioning artists students may be less familiar with, such as Jenny Holzer and Lucian Freud. On occasion we have watched Alexa Meade's TED talk about her processes. As all of this happens, stu- dents begin to develop their concepts, providing context for step two. Inspiring Questions Step two of the process requires stu- dents to consider these questions: Who are you? What's your identity as a student, daughter/son, friend, art- ist, etc.? How can you express this through a meaningful self-portrait? What setting will help express your idea? How is the setting important to the concept? Which artist will help you express your concept? Once these questions have been explored, stu- dents develop a written proposal that answers those questions. Photography Techniques While students are working on their self-reflections, they are also learning about shooting high-quality portraits. They learn about lighting and basic compositional techniques (leading lines, rule of thirds, fill the frame, and level horizon) while experiment- ing with photo shoot locations inside and outside the classroom. We take a tour of all the available light sources in the school near win- dows and discuss how to cast the light on the subject's face, not at their back. We also discuss point of view and how the photographer's vantage point can become the viewer's point of view. How do you want the viewer to see you as the subject? Is a full head-on portrait the best, or should the point of view be something else? We also dis- cuss and explore other types of light- THE AVERAGE SELFIE BEYOND H I G H S C H O O L Jeanne Bjork The goal is for the final portrait to no longer resemble a photograph, but to become a digital illustration. Left: Caption. Top-right: Caption. Middle-right: Caption. Bottom-right: Caption CONTINUED ON PAGE 63. GREAT ART DOING GOOD YOUR STUDENT'S COULD BE We invite qualifying* K12 public school art teachers to submit 2D artwork to be considered for the award-winning Fresh Artists' Collection The first 50 teachers to submit will receive a small gift from Fresh Artists and our sponsors. READ MORE: *70%+ FRL bit.ly/submit-artwork SPONSORED BY:

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